Posted in Uncategorized

Wish you were HAIR!!! Tips and Tricks for Chemo and hair loss.

23618_1272383762707_1023283416_30650339_2420140_nLet’s Talk about Hair Loss……………………
You might not think about how important your hair is until you face losing it. And if you have cancer and are about to undergo chemotherapy, the chance of hair loss is very real. Both men and women report hair loss as one of the side effects they fear most after being diagnosed with cancer.
Whether or not you have hair loss from your chemotherapy depends mostly on the type and dose of medication you receive. But whether you can maintain a healthy body image after hair loss depends a lot on your attitude and the support of your friends and family.
Chemotherapy and hair loss: Why does it occur?
Chemotherapy drugs are powerful medications that attack rapidly growing cancer cells. Unfortunately, these drugs also attack other rapidly growing cells in your body — including those in your hair roots.
Chemotherapy may cause hair loss all over your body — not just on your scalp. Sometimes your eyelash, eyebrow, armpit, pubic and other body hair also falls out. Some chemotherapy drugs are more likely than others to cause hair loss, and different doses can cause anything from a mere thinning to complete baldness. Talk to your doctor or nurse about the medication you’ll be taking. Your doctor or nurse can tell you what to expect.
Fortunately, most of the time hair loss from chemotherapy is temporary. You can expect to regrow your hair three to 10 months after your treatment ends, though your hair may temporarily be a different shade or texture.
Chemotherapy and hair loss: What should you expect?
Hair usually begins falling out one to three weeks after you start treatment. It could fall out very quickly in clumps or gradually. You’ll likely notice accumulations of loose hair on your pillow, in your hairbrush or comb, or in your sink or shower drain. Your scalp may feel tender.
Your hair loss will continue throughout your treatment and up to a few weeks afterward. Whether your hair thins or you become completely bald will depend on your treatment.
It may take several weeks after treatment for your hair to recover and begin growing again. When your hair starts to grow back, it will probably be slightly different from the hair you lost. But the difference is usually temporary. Your new hair might have a different texture or color. It might be curlier than it was before, or it could be gray until the cells that control the pigment in your hair begin functioning again.
Chemotherapy and hair loss: Can hair loss be prevented?
No treatment exists that can guarantee your hair won’t fall out during or after chemotherapy. The best way for you to deal with impending hair loss is to plan ahead and focus on making yourself comfortable with your appearance before, during and after your cancer treatment.
Several treatments have been investigated as possible ways to prevent hair loss, but none has been absolutely effective, including:
• Scalp hypothermia (cryotherapy). During your chemotherapy, ice packs or similar devices are placed on your head to slow blood flow to your scalp. This way, chemotherapy drugs are less likely to have an effect on your scalp. Studies of scalp hypothermia have found it works somewhat in the majority of people who have tried it. However, the procedure also causes a small risk of cancer recurring in your scalp, as this area doesn’t receive the same dose of chemotherapy as the rest of your body. People undergoing scalp hypothermia report feeling uncomfortably cold and having headaches.
• Minoxidil (Rogaine). Applying minoxidil — a drug approved for pattern hair loss in men and women — to your scalp before and during chemotherapy isn’t likely to prevent your hair loss, although some research shows it may speed up your hair regrowth. More research is needed to understand whether minoxidil is effective in regrowing hair after cancer treatment.
Chemotherapy and hair loss: How to make the best of it
Your hair loss generally can’t be prevented or controlled, but it can be managed. Take the following steps throughout your treatment to minimize the frustration and anxiety associated with hair loss.
Before treatment
• Be gentle to your hair. Get in the habit of being kind to your hair. Don’t bleach, color or perm your hair — this can weaken it. Air-dry your hair as much as possible and avoid heating devices such as curling irons and hot rollers. Strengthening your hair now might make it more likely to stay in your head a little longer during treatment.
• Consider cutting your hair. Short hair tends to look fuller than long hair. So as your hair falls out, it won’t be as noticeable if you have short hair. Also, if you have long hair, going short might help you make a better transition to total hair loss.
• Plan for a head covering. Now is the time to start thinking about wigs, scarves or other head coverings. Whether you choose to wear a head covering to conceal your hair loss is up to you. But it’s easier to plan for it now rather than later. Ask your doctor to write a prescription for a wig, the cost of which may be covered by your health insurance.
During treatment
• Baby your remaining hair. Continue your gentle hair strategies throughout your chemotherapy treatment. Use a soft brush. Wash your hair only as often as necessary. Consider using a gentle shampoo.
• Consider shaving your head. Some people report that their scalps feel itchy, sensitive and irritated during their treatment and while their hair is falling out. Shaving your head can reduce the irritation and save the embarrassment of shedding. Some men shave their heads because they feel it looks better than the patchy hair loss they might be experiencing.
• Protect your scalp. If your head is going to be exposed to the sun or to cold air, protect it with sunscreen or a head covering. Your scalp may be sensitive as you go through treatment, so extreme cold or sunshine can easily irritate it. Having no hair or having less hair can make you feel cold, so a head covering may make you more comfortable.
After treatment
• Continue gentle hair care. Your new hair growth will be especially fragile and vulnerable to the damage caused by styling products and heating devices. Hold off on coloring or bleaching your new hair until it grows stronger. Processing could damage your new hair and irritate your sensitive scalp.
• Be patient. It’s likely that your hair will come back slowly and that it might not look normal right away. But growth takes time, and it also takes time to repair the damage caused by your cancer treatment.
Chemotherapy and hair loss: Cover your head
Covering your head as your hair falls out is a purely personal decision. For many women hair is associated with femininity and health, so they choose to maintain that look by wearing a wig. Others choose hats and scarves. Still others choose not to cover their heads at all.
Ask your doctor or a hospital social worker about resources in your area to help you find the best head covering for you. Look Good … Feel Better is a free program that provides hair and beauty makeovers and tips to women with cancer. These classes are offered throughout the United States and in several other countries. Many classes are offered through local chapters of the American Cancer Society. Look Good…Feel Better also offers classes for teens with cancer, as well as a website especially for men.
Radiation therapy also can cause hair loss
Radiation therapy also attacks quickly growing cells in your body, but unlike chemotherapy, it affects only the specific area where treatment is concentrated. If you have radiation to your head, you’ll likely lose the hair on your head.
Your hair usually begins growing back after your treatments end. But whether it grows back to its original thickness and fullness depends on your treatment. Different types of radiation and different doses will have different effects on your hair. Higher doses of radiation can cause permanent hair loss. Talk to your doctor about what dose you’ll be receiving so that you’ll know what to expect.
Radiation therapy also affects your skin. The treatment area is likely to be red and may look sunburned or tanned. If your radiation treatment is to your head, it’s a good idea to cover your head with a protective hat or scarf because your skin will be sensitive to cold and sunlight. Wigs and other hairpieces might irritate your scalp.

Dawn’s personal recipe for Hair regrowth:
Supplements………
Biotin
MSM
Horestail
Collagen
Vitamin E

Eat plenty of high quality protein like lean meats and eggs

Daily application of Minoxidil to the scalp 1-2 X a day.
Daily application of RED LED light to the scalp. 10 min in AM and 30 Min in PM

Posted in Uncategorized

Stronger Lyrics

You know the bed feels warmer
Sleeping here alone
You know I dream in color
And do the things I want

You think you got the best of me
Think you had the last laugh
Bet you think that everything good is gone
Think you left me broken down
Think that I’d come running back
Baby you don’t know me, cause you’re devil

What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger
Stand a little taller
Doesn’t mean I’m lonely when I’m alone
What doesn’t kill you makes a fire
Put that thing on lighter
Doesn’t mean I’m over cause you’r gone

What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger, stronger
Just me, myself and I
What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger
Stand a little taller
Doesn’t mean I’m lonely when I’m alone

You heard that I was starting over with someone new
But told you I was moving on over you

You didn’t think that I’d come back
I’d come back swinging
You try to break me

What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger
Stand a little taller
Doesn’t mean I’m lonely when I’m alone
[| From: http://www.elyrics.net |]
What doesn’t kill you makes a fire
Put that thing on lighter
Doesn’t mean I’m over cause you’r gone

What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger, stronger
Just me, myself and I
What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger
Stand a little taller
Doesn’t mean I’m lonely when I’m alone
Thanks to you I’m not a broken hearted
You know in the end the day to left was just my beginning
In the end…

What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger
Stand a little taller
Doesn’t mean I’m lonely when I’m alone
What doesn’t kill you makes a fire
Put that thing on lighter
Doesn’t mean I’m over cause you’r gone

What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger, stronger
Just me, myself and I
What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger
Stand a little taller
Doesn’t mean I’m lonely when I’m alone

What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger, stronger
Just me, myself and I
What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger
Stand a little taller
Doesn’t mean I’m lonely when I’m alone
when I’m alone
Lyrics from eLyrics.net

Posted in Uncategorized

Space Coast Cancer on Channel 9 News WFTV

http://www.wftv.com/news/events/art-and-healing-program-impacting-lives-space-coas/nWPLB/

 

TITUSVILLE, Fla. —

On January 10, 2013, Mike Fowler purchased four pieces of artwork created by artist Matthew Livsey at the Space Coast Cancer Center in Titusville.  All four pieces were by a single artist Matthew Livsey.   Brevard Cultural Alliance and Space Coast Cancer Centers collaborate to provide quality art displays as a part of an “Art and Healing” program in the Titusville, Merritt Island, and Viera Facility which are enjoyed by staff and patients.

As a result of this sale, Artist Matthew Livsey will donate $120 of the purchase to the Space Coast Cancer Foundation.  Mr. Fowler was pleased to purchase the artwork and be able to support the Cancer Foundation at the same time.

The BCA has been contacted by several patients who have expressed a positive experience regarding the art at Space Coast Cancer Center.   One such instance, a patient was waiting in an exam room, nervous, apprehensive, and looked up to see a painting created by a friend of hers.   She was comforted and felt as if her friend was there at Space Coast Cancer Center, with her.

Dr. Levine and Space Coast Cancer Center has been a champion for the arts and artists in our community and sees the value of artwork in the facilities and the contribution to the healing process.

Space Coast Cancer Foundation was established in May 2006. The mission is to assist cancer patients and their caregivers in our community with the financial and emotional demands that are associated with the diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

Space Coast Cancer Foundation provides patient transportation, direct financial assistance to help pay for pain medication, anti-nausea medication, and other support needs (wigs, scarves, hats) of cancer patients. They collaborate with Walgreen’s Pharmacy for prescriptions that are filled locally. They also assist patients without insurance by contacting pharmaceutical companies for free chemotherapy for those patients that are eligible and qualify.

Call 855.894.HOPE (4673) ask for Dawn Faust for to donate your time or money to help local cancer patients.

Posted in Uncategorized

Shirley Miller a “B PINK” lady, a mother, a friend……………RIP

Shirley Kay Vought Miller

Rockledge, FL

Shirley Kay Vought Miller, 52 (beloved mother, sister, and friend), went to be with her Lord on Saturday, January 26th, after a long battle with cancer.

An active member of the First Baptist Church, she participated in the choir and Rejoice Dance Ministry and was an accountant for the Cocoa Beach Hilton. She belonged to the Pink Ladies Cancer Support Group. Survived by her children: Andrew (Sarah) and Michael Hampton, and Cassandra Miller; grandchildren, Serenity, Tyler, Terra, and Connor.

Memorial service will be held on, Saturday February 2nd, at 2 pm, at First Baptist Church, Merritt island. Viewing at 1:30 pm.

In lieu of flowers, please make donations to the Shirley Kay Miller Memorial Fund at Kennedy Space Center Credit Union.

Guest book at Brownlie Maxwell Funeral Home, Melbourne.

Posted in Uncategorized

Groundhog Day……………Repost

 

funny-groundhog-day-0

 

 

In 1993 a comedic movie was released starring Bill Murray and Andie Mc Dowell.  The basic plot is as follows:

Self-centered and sour TV meteorologist Phil Connors (Bill Murray), news producer Rita (Andie MacDowell) and cameraman Larry (Chris Elliott) from fictional Pittsburgh television station WPBH-TV9 travel to Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, to cover the annual Groundhog Dayfestivities with Punxsutawney Phil. Having grown tired of this assignment, Phil grudgingly gives his report and attempts to return to Pittsburgh when a blizzard shuts down the roads. Phil and his team are forced to return to Punxsutawney and stay in town overnight.

Phil wakes up to find that he is reliving February 2. The day plays out exactly as it did before, with no one else aware of the time loop, and only Phil aware of past events. At first he is confused, but, when the phenomenon continues on subsequent days, he decides to take advantage of the situation with no fear of long-term consequences: he learns secrets from the town’s residents, seduces women, steals money, drives recklessly, and gets thrown in jail. However, his attempts to get closer to Rita repeatedly fail.

Eventually, Phil becomes despondent and tries more and more drastically to end the time loop; he gives ridiculous and offensive reports on the festival, abuses residents, and eventually kidnaps Punxsutawney Phil and, after a police chase, drives into a quarry, evidently killing both himself and the groundhog. However, Phil wakes up and finds that nothing has changed; further attempts at suicide are just as fruitless as he continues to find himself awaking at 6:00 A.M. on the morning of February 2 with the clock-radio on his nightstand playing I Got You, Babe by Sonny & Cher.

When Phil explains the situation to Rita, she suggests that he should take advantage of it to improve himself. Inspired, Phil endeavors to try to learn more about Rita, building upon his knowledge of her and the town each day. He begins to use his by-now vast experience of the day to help as many people around town as possible. He uses the time to learn, among other things, to play piano, ice sculpt and speak French.

Eventually, Phil is able to befriend almost everyone he meets during the day, using his experiences to save lives, help townspeople, and to get closer to Rita. He crafts a report on the Groundhog Day celebration so eloquent that all the other stations turn their microphones to him. After the evening dance, Rita and Phil retire together to Phil’s room. He wakes the next morning and finds the time loop is broken; it is now February 3 and Rita is still with him. After going outside, Phil talks about living in Punxsutawney with Rita.

 

Think about your own life, do you have certain patterns of events, circumstances or failure, repeat themselves over and over?  Do you find yourself in the same failed relationships again and again.  I hate to be the bearer of bad news but the one common denominator in all these dramas is YOU!  You tell yourself that, you just need a better partner, boss.  You need to change the cast of characters etc.  What you don’t realize is that it is YOU that creates and re creates the same drama again and again.  You can change the names, but the core problem remains the same.

It has been said that the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result.  Are you insane?

What do you do to break the cycle?  Begin with YOU.  Realize that in order for your life to be different, YOU MUST BE DIFFERENT.  Being different feels really weird at first.  You will feel like a fish out of water.  But remember that in order to adopt different behavior patterns, you must adopt different behavior, thoughts and eventually beliefs.  It takes time and lots of consistent mental work.  Over time though, you can do it……..you can change your life.  BUT you must begin with YOU!!

How ironic that the Groundhog Day is all about shadows.  A shadow is an area where direct light from a light source cannot reach due to obstruction by an object.  The obstruction in this analogy is you and your unproductive, faulty beliefs and patterns.  Do yourself a favor and get out of your own way today.  Try to thoughtfully respond to others instead of reacting.  Your figurative spring could be just around the corner.

2 Corinthians 5:7  New International Version (NIV

)17 Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, the new creation has come:[a] The old has gone, the new is here!